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Posted: comet.paws on  Mar 31 11:52:36 PM
Title: A psychological account of greedy actions  
Speaker:
Erik Helzer
Johns Hopkins University
Sponsor: Carnegie Mellon University  >  Tepper School of Business
Series: Tepper Organizational Behaviour and Theory Seminar
Date: Apr 19, 2019 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM
URL: https://server1.tepper.cmu.edu/Seminars/abstracts.asp?sem_speaker=Helzer&sem_date=04/19/19&sem_firstname=Erik
Location: Tepper Quad 4242
Paper: http://econ.tepper.cmu.edu\Seminars\docs\Helzer_Greed_Harm HelzerRosenzweig.pdf
Detail: Abstract of A psychological account of greedy actions



Despite its centrality to public discourse and everyday ethical judgment and behavior, a robust conceptual understanding of greed has been lacking from the organizational behavior literature. This paper closely examines factors that shape perceptions of greedy actions and business practices. Moving beyond existing accounts that conceptualize greed as a sin of acquisitiveness or insatiability (always wanting more), we find in five studies that real or potential harm to other parties is an additional important determinant of whether actions are seen as greedy. People are sensitive to both the degree and nature of harm, and use harm as a cue to greed under conditions of high and low acquisitiveness. Moreover, we find that people use both acquisitiveness and harm to evaluate the amount of greed reflected in real-world business practices. Results are discussed in terms of implications for theory and practice, and a conceptual model for understanding perceptions of greed is developed.
Interest Area: Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences
 
 
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